As We Commemorate Holocaust Remembrance Day, We Honor the Blessed Memory of Those Who Were Killed, Ros-Lehtinen Says

Apr 5, 2013

(WASHINGTON) – U.S. Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-FL), Chairman of the Middle East and North Africa Subcommittee, released the following statement in honor of Holocaust Memorial Day. Statement by Ros-Lehtinen:

“As we commemorate Yom HaShoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day, we remember the millions of people who endured unspeakable suffering at the hands of the Nazis, including the murder of six million Jews and millions of others. We honor their memory by ensuring that this horrific chapter of human history will never be forgotten and will never be repeated.

“Though we honor the memory of those who suffered and perished under the Nazis, this day also serves as a reminder to the world of the dangers of authoritarian and repressive regimes that will stop at nothing to destroy those whom they hate. In the wake of the Holocaust, the Jews established a state of their own, the democratic Jewish State of Israel, to ensure that they could never again be threatened with extinction. Yet today Israel is faced with perhaps greater threats than ever before. The Iranian regime has repeatedly stated its desire to wipe Israel off the map and is aggressively pursuing nuclear weapons capabilities. Hezbollah, Hamas, and other terrorist organizations who do not recognize Israel’s right to exist continue to seek its destruction. In Syria, Assad’s chemical weapons are coming dangerously close to falling into the hands of groups like al-Qaeda and other extremist elements who are leading the push for an Islamic government in a post-Assad Syria.

“So as we commemorate Holocaust Remembrance Day, my thoughts and prayers are with all those affected by this horrific tragedy and human history’s darkest period, and I will continue to push to get justice for survivors of the holocaust through passage of my holocaust insurance bill. ”

Note: During the 112th Congress, Ros-Lehtinen, along with Rep. Ted Deutch (FL-21) introduced H.R. 890, the Holocaust Insurance Accountability Act, which would restore survivors’ rights to bring a civil action in federal district court against the insurer, or a related company of the insurer, to recover proceeds due that were denied to them during and after the Holocaust.